Our Future Aerospace Engineers

Baltimore County 4-H is pleased to share a blog post written by our 2 State Aerospace champions, Logan Moon and Craig Stone. While one of our 4-H’ers is starting his 4-H career, the other is finishing it out and beginning the next chapter of his life in college. Best of luck to both of these fine youth.


By Logan, Age 10, Hunt Valley Robotics Club 

I’ll never forget July 22, 2018. It was a Sunday, and it was the finals of the Maryland 4-H Aerospace Challenge. After the qualifier in June where I presented judges with a stomp rocket I had made, I was so excited to qualify for the finals. I spent weeks studying rocket parts, building model rockets, and learning facts on aerodynamics, rocketry, and model rocket safety. It was hard taking time out during my summer vacation to prepare for the challenge, but I did it because I wanted to do well at the competition.

I had butterflies in my stomach when we drove there that day, but since I had been at the competition last year, I felt better as soon as we got out of the car because I recognized the building and the adult volunteers who tried to keep the day fun. I was relieved when the first part of the challenge was to name parts of the rocket. I got through it quickly, and it helped me feel more confident to complete the knowledge test which was a lot harder. Lastly, they had us build a model rocket with a payload section.  That’s the part of some model rockets that carry cargo. This year the juniors would launch a live cricket in our rockets. I felt a little weird about that because I’m not sure if our crickets wanted to take a ride in our rockets. Before we left the table, I decorated my rocket that I named the Cricket Crusader, and  I had to double check the fins and launch lug to make sure they were on straight otherwise the rocket wouldn’t fly straight, and I knew my cricket was depending on me to make sure he was safe. After our rockets dried, it was time to launch. All I wanted was to do better than I did last year. Last year my rocket fizzled out on the launch rod and never took flight.

When they asked who wanted to go first, I volunteered. I was so nervous and excited. Five, four, three, two, one, lift off. My rocket launched straight up, the parachute deployed, and the cricket landed safely inside the payload. After the judges inspected the rocket one last time, I released my cricket. He was alive, and I felt relieved. I did it! My rocket launched! No matter where I placed I felt proud of myself. It turned out that all of that hard work paid off. I was awarded the junior champion ribbon. It’s a ribbon that means so much to me, and the challenge is an experience I will always remember.

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By Craig Stone, Age 18, Sparks 4-H Club

“Throughout my 4-H career, I have participated in various types of activities. Out of the many activities I have participated in, the aerospace program has influenced me quite a bit. I have been participating in the Maryland 4-H Aerospace Challenge for about five years, and it has taught me many things about rocketry that I didn’t know before. For example, I never knew that the maximum height a rocket reaches in its flight path is called apogee. The aerospace program that 4-H has to offer is extremely beneficial to the 4-H youth because it uses the experiential learning model in “learning to do by doing.” This teaches the 4-Hers about all sorts of scientific discoveries in a way they would never experience in school. Overall, my 4-H aerospace experience has greatly influenced my 4-H career, and will continue to help me through college and beyond.”

INTERNET SAFETY

by Terry Fields, Hunt Valley Robotics Club

We are members of the Hunt Valley 4-H LEGO Robotics team. We have been learning about the FBI and some of the ways they keep us safe. Our club would like to tell you about the importance of internet safety! Here are some tips we learned from the FBI:

Don’t use your name, birthdate or address in your password

  • This can cause someone to track you down

It is safer to use websites that end in .gov, .edu and .org

  • Things that end in .gov stand for government
  • Things that end in .edu stand for education
  • The website more likely to be appropriate for kids

Don’t download any app without your parent or guardian’s permission…it may be a scam!

  • This could be a scam and what a scam is a trick that people play to gets someone’s location

Create a password that is 13 characters long and made up of letters, numbers and symbols

  • If you have a username that is short and has your name, it is unsafe because this is giving away personal information

Don’t share your password with anyone

  • If you share your password with anyone except parent or guardian someone might do something bad to you

Follow all of these tips and maybe when you grow up you can help the FBI too!

Parkers Flyer 4H (2)

Learn more about our club at: http://huntvalleyrobotics.org/

 

Leicester Longwool Sheep

Baltimore County 4-H wanted to catch up with Lynne Thomas a senior 4-H’er in the Baldwin 4-H Club to talk to her about her Leicester (pronounced lester) Longwool Sheep. After seeing Lynne in the ring showing her sheep we wanted to know more about how she acquired her, why she picked this breed and what plans did she have with her.

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Lynne showing Melody at the Baltimore County 4-H Fair.

Lynne shared the history of this breed, and that was in part what attracted her to this beautiful animal. It seems that a breeder by the name of Robert Bakewell around 1755 wanted to improve livestock breeds, so he used modern selection techniques to crossbreed an animal that was a large, slow-growing animal into one that grew more quickly for market and had a much better fleece. Word quickly spread from England to the rest of Europe and North America that the Leicester Longwool was an excellent animal to add to your herd. George Washington, upon hearing about the breed added it to his flock.

In America, this breed was used to crossbreed with native stocks during the 1800s, but soon the strain lost popularity and nearly became extinct by 1930. But then in 1990, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation began to bring the Leicester Longwool Sheep back. The numbers have been slowly growing. It is still a rare breed globally.

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Seen in the ring are Cadence and Baritone.

Lynne discovered the breed at the Sheep and Wool Festival in 2016 through the Youth Conservationist Program. She applied to the program by completing an essay they require and recommendations from her teachers and 4-H mentors. She was accepted, and she was the proud owner of Melody her first Leicester Longwool sheep. Lynne has shown her in the County Fair, the Hereford Jr. Farm Fair and others. Additionally, Lynne enjoys educating the public about the genetics behind this beautiful breed. Details like its strong bloodline, and that it produces the best quality fleece and the history of how they came to be here in the US.

In addition, to showing Melody, she has also bred her with Baritone who is of natural color. They produced a set of twins named Cadence (a boy) and Symphony (a girl). Their names come from Lynne’s natural love of music and one of the other talents that she has of playing the clarinet. This summer Lynne showed all four animals at the Baltimore County 4-H Fair.

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Symphony takes her debut at the Baltimore County 4-H Fair.

Some of the characteristics of the wool are that it is easy to spin and makes for soft scarves, hats, gloves, and sweaters. One of the more unique items that the wool is used for is doll hair since the fleece has a natural curl and is long. It can grow up to 14 inches. The coat is ideal for doll hair.

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Closeup of the Leicester Longwool fleece.

As part of Lynne’s high school education, she used her sheep project for her Supervised Agricultural Experience. In her sophomore year Lynne tracked the rate of gain of Melody. Then in her junior year, she followed several other breeds and compared them to the rate of gain of the Leicester Longwool.

When asked what’s next Lynne said she would love to learn to spin the wool from her sheep and create some wonderful garments or accessories from this extraordinary breed. She plans to continue educating the public about this breed and wants to encourage other youth to get involved with animal conservation. We look forward to seeing what comes next.

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Liberty 4-H Club Gets Ready for Fair Season

by Savannah Williams
girlJune 8, 2018
Photos by Peyton Jaeger

Well, the Liberty 4-H Club enjoyed a night at 4-H, with Bird-houses,  Tie-dye, String art…Whew! That’s A LOT of FUN stuff.

The Clovers built bird-houses and added a bottom that spins upside-down  so they can clean out the house for birds, once they move out! Also, the Clovers learned All about Bluebirds (about washingtheir environment and diet and more)!

Everyone enjoys color, don’t they? Well, the Juniors and Intermediates Tie-dyed some white shirts, and they look AMAZING! A lot of people did cool designs and some original!

The Seniors did cool String art. Some people did horses and deer skulls, and some did cow skulls! They had fun looping and stretching the strings from nail to nail. string art

At the end, we all had snacks such as: Strawberry-short cakes, brownies and C-C Cookies! We all enjoyed our night at 4-H.
Good luck at the county and State fair.

2018 Champion Chow Food Challenge

Reported by 4-H’ers Colby, Mikayla and Della

The Champion Chow Food Challenge is a program for 4-H youth ages 5-18 to compete in creating a themed menu, a place setting and preparing one food item from their menu. They meet with judges either as a team or as individuals and answer a range of questions about how and why they selected the menu and food they prepared. They are judged on their menu. How well was it nutritionally planned, texture contrast, flavor contrast, suitable for age, youth’s verbal nutrition knowledge, was the recipe correctly written, eye appeal, flavor, properly cooked, seasoning, complexity, overall neatness, proper placement of utensils, attractive, decorations, speaks distinctly and correctly, shows enthusiasm and sincerity and appears neat and poised.

This year’s Champion Chow Food Challenge competition had a full house of participants and family members. This program has grown by 75% over the last 8 years.

 

During this year’s competition 4-H’ers who were either a reporter for their club or a photographer gathered questions and answers from their peers. The following is the result of their investigation. Many thanks to all who contributed to this post.

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Colby is an 8 year old 4-H’er in the Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club. He is the club photographer. Colby eagerly took many photos of all of the place settings and food that was made.  Colby interviewed Jake also from Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club and he is 8 years old.

Q: Have you done this event before?

A: No, this is my first time.

Q: What did you make?

A: Beef tenderloin

Q: What was your inspiration?

A: Living on a farm, and playing in the backyard.

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Next Colby interviewed Kailyn who is 12 years old and in the Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club as well.

Q: Have you done this event before?

A: Yes, about five times.

Q: What was your favorite of your themes?

A: Making patterns

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Lastly Colby spoke with Shelby. She is 11 years old and is a member of Chestnut Ridge Club.

Q: What was your inspiration for your food?

A: Charlotte’s sister’s birthday.

Q: What was the hardest part of making your cake?

A: Keeping the ingredients in the bowl.

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Mikayla is the Baltimore County 4-H Dairy Goat Club reporter. She is 10 years old and she meticulously interviewed several people. First, she spoke with Kiera from the Sparks 4-H Club.

Q: What’s your theme and why did you choose it?

A: My theme is a traditional Irish dinner.

Q: What did you make as your dish?

A: Roasted salmon with butter sauce

Q: What is your favorite part of your setting?

A: The centerpiece

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Mikayla also interviewed Grace who is a member of the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club and she is 11 years old.

Q: What’s your theme and why did you choose it?

A: The theme is summer picnic. I like to have summer picnics.

Q: What were the challenges you had with making your dish?

A: I ran out of mustard a lot. Each steak test cooked differently and I didn’t know how long to cook it.

Q: What is your favorite part of your setting?

A: The tablecloth

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Lastly, Della a 7 year old from the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club who strategically interviewed several people starting with Niamh who is a member of the Sparks 4-H Club.

Q: Why did you make your dish?

A: I made Irish Nachos because I had them at the Stihl after dancing and I learned to make them.

 

Della interviewed Kailyn from the Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club.

Q: What did you make?

A: I made fruit kabobs.

Q: Why did you make it?

A: Peeps are a good candy.

Q: Where did you find your recipe?

A: On Pinterest

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Then finally Della interviewed 7 year old Alexandra from Liberty 4-H.

Q: What did you make?

A: Baked cinnamon chips with applesauce.

Q: Where did you find your recipe?

A: It is from a princess cookbook I got at Christmas.

 

 

 

 

Food preservation

What do 4-H’ers do with a bountiful harvest?

It is that time of year when harvesting fruits and vegetables is an everyday occurrence. Which begs the question what do you do with all of the extra produce you grow? Well if you are like some 4-H’ers you learn to preserve your extra bounty. One such 4-H’er is David Thomas. David is a Senior 4-H’er and an avid canner. “I can pickles, relishes, and jellies for my family because we think that these homemade products taste better than store-bought ones! By canning, I am continuing a family tradition that goes back many generations. In fact, the grinder and slicer I use to make relish and pickles are the same ones that my great-grandmother used when she made these products.  In 2013, my sister, Lynne, and I taped a story about canning which aired on Fox 45 television. Can you believe that when we went to the Orioles game the next week, one of the ushers recognized us from this television segment?” says David.

There are many types of food preservation one that Ian Moore recently learned how to do is jams. Ian is the President of the Dairy Goat Club and shares the following; “Jelly, jam, preserves, conserves, and marmalades are alike. All are fruit commodities that are thickened to some extent. Most are preserved by sugar. Their characteristics depend on the kind of fruit used and the way it is prepared, the proportions of ingredients in the mixture and the method of cooking. The finished jar will differ in clarity, color, consistency, and flavor.”

Ian took an adult food preservation class with Dr. Shauna Henley a Family Consumer Science educator for the University of Maryland Extension and learned safe preservation techniques. Some of our 4-H’ers learn through our project guides from the Home Food Preservation set which follow the USDA food preservation guidelines. Go to this web page if you would like to find out more about 4-H food preservation http://ter.ps/foodpreserve . And the USDA’s canning website and the National Center for Home Food Preservation website are http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html
http://nchfp.uga.edu/

So, if you have been growing your fruits and vegetables and would like to enter a preserved jar of your own in the fair here are some helpful tips.

What makes a prize winning preserve?

  1. Start with quality fruits and vegetables
  2. No bruised or blemished products
  3. Over or under ripe products can result in less desired final product
  4. Use new rings – no rust
  5. Filling your container neatly and with the proper amount of head space
  6. Do not add colors to enhance the appearance of your product
  7. Use the proper size jar to match the size of the fruit or vegetable
  8. Avoid particles and cloudiness
  9. Use enough of the liquid to cover the product
  10. Good consistency for jams and jellies
  11. No large chunks of fruits
  12. Have a clean lid

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4-H Dairy Goat Club Learn to Shine as Showmen

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Doug Ryndak, 4-H Club Leader for the Baltimore County Dairy Goat Club

Recently, the Baltimore County 4-H Dairy Goat Club participated in a practice show for goats hosted at the Weymouth Farm owned by Mike and Pam Spencer. Doug Ryndak is the Baltimore County 4-H Dairy Goat Club leader shares the following, “Showing an animal, especially for the first time can be an overwhelming experience, luckily each year we are able to provide the Dairy Goat Club and other 4-H youth with a chance to try their hand at showing dairy goats.  It is great for not only new 4-H youth who have never shown dairy goats before to have an opportunity to practice before their first real show, but also for seasoned showmen to hone their skills and learn new tips on showing.  It is always a fun time to get together and give the kids a confident start to the show season. Even though these kids will ultimately be competing against each other in the show ring, they are always helping each other and teaching each other, which is what the 4-H program is all about.”

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Bonnie Six with Pam and Mike Spencer and one of their goats.

Mrs. Bonnie Six conducted the showing clinic on a beautiful evening in May. She is a dairy goat judge at the Hereford Jr. Farm Fair and comes every year to help club members practice showing. Besides having the opportunity to practice showing their goats the 4-H’ers learned what questions the judges might ask. “Typically the judges will ask you about a goat’s diet, physical appearance, goat anatomy, and hygiene.” Suggests Ian Moore, president of the Dairy Goat Club. To prepare for these types of questions Danielle Ryndak, Vice President of the Dairy Goat Club adds, “Practice anatomy and the scorecard, to do that block a few minutes each day to study your anatomy and scorecard. Just 10 minutes a day will make you a champ. Make flash cards and test yourself. When you are competing in “Fitting and Showing” the judge will ask you questions to do with anatomy and will ask you points in the scorecard. Also, know your goats ADGA registered name, breed, birth date, and freshening date as the judge will ask these in the ring.”

Mrs. Bonnie talked about the qualities of what makes a good showman while the youth and kids moved around the practice area. Many of the club members heard her say that working with your goat year round will make for the best showmen. If you take just a few minutes each day, it will pay off at show time. Others felt that when you work with your goat year round, it helps the goat feel more comfortable with you and you with them. This includes walking with your goat, setting them up in the proper position for the judges to view their anatomy and form. Chloe Soots recalls, “The central part the judge is looking at is the mammary system. It is one of the largest point areas on the scorecard.” Danielle suggests, “The judge can tell by how you handle your goat how often your work with her. You will want to keep your hands off your goat as much as possible. Do not scratch them or pet them when in the ring.”

Confidence is also what makes a champion. Danielle suggests, “Wear the correct show attire. This depends on if you are in an open or 4-H or FFA show. It even depends on what region or state you are showing in, but the most common is white boot cut jeans, white long sleeve button down polo shirt, boots, belt, and bolo tie or tie. Look professional in the ring. Hair pulled back and no hot pink or blue hair. Girls bling is fine, but not too much or will be distracting and unprofessional.” All of the members thought practice made for a more confident showman.

As the evening wore on the youth were shown how to correctly “set” their goats. Chloe explains “line up the pin bones to the hocks to the ground for the back legs and the withers to the knees to the ground for the front legs. And you should stand on the other side of the goat.  So think of it as a peanut butter sandwich.  The goat is the peanut butter, and you and the judge are the slices of bread.” Grace suggests “being aware of the other showmen and goats in the ring so that everyone doesn’t bunch up and crowd each other helps the judge to see your goat and your actions in the ring.”

Many new tips were learned from Mrs. Bonnie, and some of the youth shared tips that they have learned by showing in lots of shows. Patrick Wicklein, former Dairy Goat President, and multiple Dairy Goat Champion shared, “watch your expression, often in the ring, you will see people with silly smiles on their face. It is important to look confident and serious about what you are doing it while enjoying it too.” Ian adds, “Always watch the judge the entire time you are in the show ring.” Danielle, a multiple champion concludes “Some Suggestions I have, to use a goat show collar. There is a reason there is such a thing. DO NOT use a dog collar. Don’t brace your dairy goat. Bracing means to put your leg in front of your goat and to push your knee into their chest. You will see this practice with showing meat goats and sheep. With these animals it is allowed, but not with dairy goats. Clip your goats 3 to 6 days before a show. Wash your goat at least before your first show of the season. Watch videos on YouTube of shows so that you know what to expect. When at a show add Gatorade in your goat’s water so they do not become dehydrated. Because we are on well water, the goats will not drink the water when at a show because it is usually city water. WORK HARD! DO YOUR BEST!”

All of the Baltimore County 4-H Dairy Goat members learned a great deal and enjoyed the rest of the evening sharing food and stories at the Weymouth Farm. If you have an interest in dairy goats and would like to join our club, please contact the 4-H office at 410-887-8090 for more information.

Front view of the entire group