Teamwork Towers

By Katelyn Fullerton, Vice President of the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club

20190404_191132.jpgAt our Greater Loch Raven 4-H club meeting on April 4, 2019, our challenge was to build the tallest freestanding tower that could stand ten seconds while holding a marshmallow peep on top. Each pair of club members were given a bag of jellybeans, a box of toothpicks, and the peep.

It was a fun and interesting challenge of teamwork and engineering. We had to work together to find out how to build the tower without it 20190404_191143.jpgtoppling. We also had to use our engineering skills to realize that the tower needed support and to find the weak point in the tower. I think a challenge like this can “build” up engineering and teamwork skills, and I hope that other clubs will be able to try this challenge.

 

Precious Hours After School

By: Andrea Miotto, new 4-H VISTA intern

Hey, 4-H’ers! I hope you’re staying warm out there. This is your friendly neighborhood VISTA volunteer, Andrea, with a question for you: how do you spend your time between school and dinner? As I’m working to expand 4-H’s afterschool programs, I’ve come across some surprising news: Participating in fun and interesting programs between the hours of 3 and 5 p.m. can make you a better student in school!

The Afterschool Alliance, a nation-wide organization working to expand afterschool opportunities to all kids, says that “afterschool and summer learning programs are locally-designed school and community solutions that help kids learn and grow, keep children and teenagers safe, and support families to balance work with home.”

Kids who participate show increased achievement in reading and math grades; higher scores on standardized tests; fewer days absent from school; lower risk of dropping out of school; greater classroom participation; and higher motivation toward learning.

Besides 4-H, young people find these afterschool opportunities in schools, community centers, churches and temples, daycare businesses, and organizations including Scouts, Boys and Girls Clubs, and the Y. In fact, 4-H often teams up with groups like these to offer the 4-H projects you might already know about from 4-H clubs—things like robotics, healthy living, crafts, livestock, and STEM—to more kids. Other 4-H afterschool programs are independent and stand on their own.

Some 4-H afterschool programs are short-term courses, lasting a few weeks, while others might meet for months or a year. Just as in 4-H chartered clubs, afterschool programs rely on dedicated adult and teen volunteers to bring to life fun new learning experiences.

Here’s something to think about: how could you be spending your time between the time you get home from and when you eat supper? Could you be learning an exciting skill? Getting new information about something you care about? Or even helping someone in your school or community?

Like my last post, I’ll leave you with a few ideas about serving others from the publication “366 Community Service Ideas for 4-H and Youth” by the Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County:

Grandfather under drip

  • Bring toys, books, craft supplies, or games to sick or injured children at a local hospital. You could even work with classmates, teachers, school counselors or your principal to collect toys. Tip: Make sure you contact the hospital you have in mind ahead of time to see what supplies are most needed and what rules they might have about visitors.

Patient wearing oxygen mask while sleeping

  • Why not craft a hand-made thank-you card for someone who works hard, helps out a lot, and might be under-appreciated at your school, gym, afterschool program, community center, parent’s workplace, doctor’s office or church? This could be a person who stays “in the background” doing jobs like scheduling appointments, cleaning, gardening, or fixing things. Folks like these don’t always get the recognition they deserve!

Children's drawing for Mother's Day

 

 

 

 

Our Future Aerospace Engineers

Baltimore County 4-H is pleased to share a blog post written by our 2 State Aerospace champions, Logan Moon and Craig Stone. While one of our 4-H’ers is starting his 4-H career, the other is finishing it out and beginning the next chapter of his life in college. Best of luck to both of these fine youth.


By Logan, Age 10, Hunt Valley Robotics Club 

I’ll never forget July 22, 2018. It was a Sunday, and it was the finals of the Maryland 4-H Aerospace Challenge. After the qualifier in June where I presented judges with a stomp rocket I had made, I was so excited to qualify for the finals. I spent weeks studying rocket parts, building model rockets, and learning facts on aerodynamics, rocketry, and model rocket safety. It was hard taking time out during my summer vacation to prepare for the challenge, but I did it because I wanted to do well at the competition.

I had butterflies in my stomach when we drove there that day, but since I had been at the competition last year, I felt better as soon as we got out of the car because I recognized the building and the adult volunteers who tried to keep the day fun. I was relieved when the first part of the challenge was to name parts of the rocket. I got through it quickly, and it helped me feel more confident to complete the knowledge test which was a lot harder. Lastly, they had us build a model rocket with a payload section.  That’s the part of some model rockets that carry cargo. This year the juniors would launch a live cricket in our rockets. I felt a little weird about that because I’m not sure if our crickets wanted to take a ride in our rockets. Before we left the table, I decorated my rocket that I named the Cricket Crusader, and  I had to double check the fins and launch lug to make sure they were on straight otherwise the rocket wouldn’t fly straight, and I knew my cricket was depending on me to make sure he was safe. After our rockets dried, it was time to launch. All I wanted was to do better than I did last year. Last year my rocket fizzled out on the launch rod and never took flight.

When they asked who wanted to go first, I volunteered. I was so nervous and excited. Five, four, three, two, one, lift off. My rocket launched straight up, the parachute deployed, and the cricket landed safely inside the payload. After the judges inspected the rocket one last time, I released my cricket. He was alive, and I felt relieved. I did it! My rocket launched! No matter where I placed I felt proud of myself. It turned out that all of that hard work paid off. I was awarded the junior champion ribbon. It’s a ribbon that means so much to me, and the challenge is an experience I will always remember.

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By Craig Stone, Age 18, Sparks 4-H Club

“Throughout my 4-H career, I have participated in various types of activities. Out of the many activities I have participated in, the aerospace program has influenced me quite a bit. I have been participating in the Maryland 4-H Aerospace Challenge for about five years, and it has taught me many things about rocketry that I didn’t know before. For example, I never knew that the maximum height a rocket reaches in its flight path is called apogee. The aerospace program that 4-H has to offer is extremely beneficial to the 4-H youth because it uses the experiential learning model in “learning to do by doing.” This teaches the 4-Hers about all sorts of scientific discoveries in a way they would never experience in school. Overall, my 4-H aerospace experience has greatly influenced my 4-H career, and will continue to help me through college and beyond.”

INTERNET SAFETY

by Terry Fields, Hunt Valley Robotics Club

We are members of the Hunt Valley 4-H LEGO Robotics team. We have been learning about the FBI and some of the ways they keep us safe. Our club would like to tell you about the importance of internet safety! Here are some tips we learned from the FBI:

Don’t use your name, birthdate or address in your password

  • This can cause someone to track you down

It is safer to use websites that end in .gov, .edu and .org

  • Things that end in .gov stand for government
  • Things that end in .edu stand for education
  • The website more likely to be appropriate for kids

Don’t download any app without your parent or guardian’s permission…it may be a scam!

  • This could be a scam and what a scam is a trick that people play to gets someone’s location

Create a password that is 13 characters long and made up of letters, numbers and symbols

  • If you have a username that is short and has your name, it is unsafe because this is giving away personal information

Don’t share your password with anyone

  • If you share your password with anyone except parent or guardian someone might do something bad to you

Follow all of these tips and maybe when you grow up you can help the FBI too!

Parkers Flyer 4H (2)

Learn more about our club at: http://huntvalleyrobotics.org/

 

4-H Winter Wonder Lab

On a cold winter morning, the youth of Baltimore County engaged in hands-on experiments to explore more about how agriculture and science are interconnected. Investigations were conducted to determine how advances in agriculture can help solve human issues surrounding food security and health. There were four stations for each group to rotate to perform a new experiment.

Leading the youth on the question of how does DNA look and can it be removed from foods was Vernelle Mitchell-Hawkins, 4-H Educator. At this station, youth were given a banana to mash and to filter to extract the DNA from the fruit.

Lynne Thomas, a senior 4-H’er with the Baldwin 4-H Club in Baltimore County, taught the class on flower dissection at the Winter Wonder Lab workshop. At this station, Lynne showed the students how to dissect flowers and identify the different parts. They discussed the process of pollination and why pollinators, such as bees and butterflies, are so crucial for food production.

Lynne said she volunteered to help with this workshop because she plans to major in agriculture education in college. “I enjoy teaching people about where their food comes from and dispelling misinformation about the agriculture industry,” says Lynne.

At another table was Santana Mays, 4-H alumni and the college student studying to become a teacher. Santana lead workshop on how to judge meats. She had a station of four cuts of pork and beef. The youth were taught about what makes a good cut of meat. Next, they each had an opportunity to judge which was the best. Many of the kids commented that they didn’t know that there was a competition for meat judging and that it was something they could participate in through 4-H.

At Dwayne Murphy’s station, the youth had the opportunity to use a refractometer to determine the concentrations of liquid solutions. Each person tested the amount of sugar in fresh fruit as compared to a fruit drink. Which do you think had more sugar? You guessed it; the fruit drink had a higher concentration of sugar than the fresh fruits. The youth also explored the benefits of eating a healthy diet.

 

In the closing project, each of the participants made butter from scratch and got to eat their production on pretzels. Yum.

As a result of this workshop, youth were interested in pursuing a career in science because they thought it was cool, interesting and you can solve problems. Many of the kids never thought about how agriculture and science were connected and had never heard of jobs that involve agriculture and science too.

Hispanic Heritage Month

September 15 – October 15, 2017

Vernelle Mitchell HawkinsBy Vernelle Mitchell-Hawkins

Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate the many contributions of Hispanic and Latin people to the world.  This is true in 4-H as well since the organization seeks to provide a “supportive and inclusive setting for all youth to reach their fullest potential in a diverse society”.  Many Hispanic scientists have added to the body of knowledge that we now enjoy.  Did you know Dr. Mario Molina is a chemist who received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1995?  He was recognized for his work in helping to identify the man made compounds that contribute to the destruction of the ozone layer?  Dr. Luis Federico Leloir also won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1970.  He is known for his discovery that sugar nucleotides help the body turn some sugars into energy.  We salute these and all Hispanic scientists this month and every month because in Baltimore County 4-H Grows Here!

 

 

Source:
https://www.biography.com/
people/groups/hispanic-
scientists-and-educators

Local 4-H’er crosses the bridge to learn more about ecology at the UMES Sarbanes Center

20170720_104211.jpgMy name is Terry Fields. I am a junior member of the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club. I do a lot of fun things in Baltimore County but I recently went to the Eastern Shore to participate in 4-H STEM activities.

I went to the UMES Sarbanes Ecology center on the Eastern Shore. While I was there, I dissected a squid, went to the beach to catch sea creatures, I made fish prints and talked about acids and bases in water. Dissecting the squid was a bit nasty but FUN and I learned that squids have three hearts.

During the fish printing class we painted fish to reenact what people did before cameras. At the beach we saw a lot of fish and caught snails and clams. In the water quality class, we learned about acids and bases and tested water to see if it is good to drink or not. I had a good time, learned a lot and made new friends.

By Terry Fields, President of the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club