2018 Champion Chow Food Challenge

Reported by 4-H’ers Colby, Mikayla and Della

The Champion Chow Food Challenge is a program for 4-H youth ages 5-18 to compete in creating a themed menu, a place setting and preparing one food item from their menu. They meet with judges either as a team or as individuals and answer a range of questions about how and why they selected the menu and food they prepared. They are judged on their menu. How well was it nutritionally planned, texture contrast, flavor contrast, suitable for age, youth’s verbal nutrition knowledge, was the recipe correctly written, eye appeal, flavor, properly cooked, seasoning, complexity, overall neatness, proper placement of utensils, attractive, decorations, speaks distinctly and correctly, shows enthusiasm and sincerity and appears neat and poised.

This year’s Champion Chow Food Challenge competition had a full house of participants and family members. This program has grown by 75% over the last 8 years.

 

During this year’s competition 4-H’ers who were either a reporter for their club or a photographer gathered questions and answers from their peers. The following is the result of their investigation. Many thanks to all who contributed to this post.

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Colby is an 8 year old 4-H’er in the Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club. He is the club photographer. Colby eagerly took many photos of all of the place settings and food that was made.  Colby interviewed Jake also from Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club and he is 8 years old.

Q: Have you done this event before?

A: No, this is my first time.

Q: What did you make?

A: Beef tenderloin

Q: What was your inspiration?

A: Living on a farm, and playing in the backyard.

Peeps

Next Colby interviewed Kailyn who is 12 years old and in the Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club as well.

Q: Have you done this event before?

A: Yes, about five times.

Q: What was your favorite of your themes?

A: Making patterns

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Lastly Colby spoke with Shelby. She is 11 years old and is a member of Chestnut Ridge Club.

Q: What was your inspiration for your food?

A: Charlotte’s sister’s birthday.

Q: What was the hardest part of making your cake?

A: Keeping the ingredients in the bowl.

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Mikayla is the Baltimore County 4-H Dairy Goat Club reporter. She is 10 years old and she meticulously interviewed several people. First, she spoke with Kiera from the Sparks 4-H Club.

Q: What’s your theme and why did you choose it?

A: My theme is a traditional Irish dinner.

Q: What did you make as your dish?

A: Roasted salmon with butter sauce

Q: What is your favorite part of your setting?

A: The centerpiece

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Mikayla also interviewed Grace who is a member of the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club and she is 11 years old.

Q: What’s your theme and why did you choose it?

A: The theme is summer picnic. I like to have summer picnics.

Q: What were the challenges you had with making your dish?

A: I ran out of mustard a lot. Each steak test cooked differently and I didn’t know how long to cook it.

Q: What is your favorite part of your setting?

A: The tablecloth

irish nachos

Lastly, Della a 7 year old from the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club who strategically interviewed several people starting with Niamh who is a member of the Sparks 4-H Club.

Q: Why did you make your dish?

A: I made Irish Nachos because I had them at the Stihl after dancing and I learned to make them.

 

Della interviewed Kailyn from the Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club.

Q: What did you make?

A: I made fruit kabobs.

Q: Why did you make it?

A: Peeps are a good candy.

Q: Where did you find your recipe?

A: On Pinterest

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Then finally Della interviewed 7 year old Alexandra from Liberty 4-H.

Q: What did you make?

A: Baked cinnamon chips with applesauce.

Q: Where did you find your recipe?

A: It is from a princess cookbook I got at Christmas.

 

 

 

 

Baltimore County 4-H… “It’s not just cows and cooking.”

By Jennifer Coroneos

I grew up in 4-H, my parents grew up in 4-H, and even my grandparents were in 4-H and were active 4-H volunteers for almost 70 years. Needless to say, I am a third generation 4-her. While growing up, I would hear stories of how things used to be when my parents were in 4-H. It is always interesting to hear how things have changed since they were kids. Over the years many parts of 4-H have changed and developed as time goes on. Change is good though, over the years 4-H has expanded to cover new areas and increased programs.

But, I am getting ahead of myself. First, let me share with you a brief history of 4-H. (If you read my blog post last month and just want to know my thoughts on the way 4-H has expanded just skip to the section called “Good Part” now.)

HISTORY OF 4-H

In the late 1800’s, researchers discovered that adults in the farming community did not readily accept new agricultural developments on university campuses, but found that young people were open to new thinking and would experiment with new ideas and share their experiences with adults. In this way, rural youth programs introduced new agriculture technology to communities. Building community clubs to help solve agricultural challenges was the first step toward children learning about the industries in their community. A. B. Graham started a youth program in Clark County, Ohio, in 1902, which is considered the birth of 4-H in the United States. The first club was called “The Tomato Club” or the “Corn Growing Club.” T.A. Erickson of Douglas County, Minnesota, started local agricultural afterschool clubs and fairs that same year. Jessie Field Shambaugh then developed the clover pin with an H on each leaf in 1910, and by 1912 they were called 4-H clubs.

The passage of the Smith-Lever Act in 1914 created the Cooperative Extension System at USDA and nationalized 4-H. By 1924, 4- H clubs were formed, and the clover emblem was adopted. The Cooperative Extension System is a partnership of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) within the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the 109 land-grant universities, and more than 3,000 county offices across the nation.

So what does all that mean? Well, 4-H was originally designed as a way for kids who grew up on farms to get agriculture information from the universities to share with their parents. This concept of 4-H, an information tunnel from universities to families is still the key component of the 4-H program. However, today, 4-H has expanded to include many more project areas outside of agriculture.

THE GOOD PART!

I wrote a blog last month about our 4-H afterschool programs here in Baltimore County. Hopefully, you read it, if not I encourage you to do so. Anyway, like I already said 4-H has changed over the year especially in Baltimore County.  Now, don’t think of “change” with a negative connotation while you read this; rather think it of it as a positive.  Things have to change to keep up with times. That being said our traditional community clubs are still a critical part of the 4-H program. Our clubs meet about once or twice a month and are located all around the county. Clubs are a great way to get involved in the 4-H program and allow you to participate in County and State Fair, Champion Chow (a cooking competition), Public Speaking Contest, and so much more. However, our traditional clubs might not work for everyone’s busy schedules. Not to mention our traditional clubs have to compete with school and rec sports teams, video games, TV, the stigma that “4-H is just about agriculture”, and so much more.

That being said, How does 4-H stay relevant? Well, that’s why 4-H has had to develop and change over the years. 4-H can no longer be just about “Cows and Cooking” anymore. 4-H offers so much more. There are summer camps, after school programs, weekend workshops just to name a few. Baltimore County 4-H even partners with PAL centers and local Libraries to set up activities and workshops so that more 4-H curriculum can be taught to even more youth. That’s the other thing; there is so much 4-H curriculum out there, and it’s all homeschool certified. It allows parents, teachers, club leaders, and really anyone to bring 4-H into their homes. The curriculum covers every topic from aerospace to veterinarian science. I am telling you any subject you want 4-H has something for it. (A little secret we have lots of these curriculum books at our office, some are for sale so stop by and look)

In regards to 4-H, there is one last point I want to make. The 4-H Pledge, we say it before every meeting, at the start of workshops, and even every day at the onset of camp. “I pledge my Head to clearer thinking, my Heart to greater loyalty, my Hands to larger service, and my health to better living for my club, my community, my country, and my world.”  Nowhere in this pledge does it say anything about agriculture, cooking, or fair. The 4-H program is about teaching youth “To Make The Best Better.” Our program creates leaders who go out into their communities, their country, and their world to be a catalyst for change.

4-H is so much bigger than just a single 4-H program/event. It is the combination of programs and events that shape our 4-Hers into the wonderful, well-rounded, inclusive and world changing humans they are.

Yes, 4-H has changed with the times, but it has also stayed true to roots.

So if you haven’t figured it out yet…

WHY SHOULD YOUR CHILD BE IN 4-H?

4-H is the largest youth development organization in the United States with over 6 million participants!! The Maryland 4-H Youth Development Program provides a supportive setting for young people to reach their fullest potential. Children learn beneficial cognitive and life skills through community-focused, research-based, experiential educational programs. Participation is open to all youth ages 5-18. The Clover Program is open to youth ages 5-7 years, and the 4-H Program serves 8-18-year-old participants. 4-H has an over 100-year tradition of voluntary action through strong public-private partnerships at federal, state, and community levels. Local volunteer leaders and youth practitioners partner with county Extension staff from the University of Maryland to provide direct leadership and educational support to young people in urban, suburban, and rural communities. 4-H is more than just fun. 4-H can help your child grow in leadership, new skills, citizenship, friendship, and self-esteem! 4-H projects help children learn about things like animals, plants, science and nature. But, that’s not all! The project work and being part of a 4-H Club also helps a child learn life skills. Members learn to look at all sides of a problem or task, and they learn to decide on the best solution. 4-H helps reinforce what children learn in the classroom. 4-H uses more informal, hands-on teaching methods and enables children to excel in new areas and take new roles in a group.

I know my 4-H experience has molded me into the woman I am today. 4-H has opened so many doors I never would have even thought existed and it continues to guide my future.

4-H Champion Chow Food Challenge

Each year Baltimore County 4-H holds an event that is unique. The Champion Chow Food Challenge gives the 4-H’er the opportunity to present their food preparation, menu planning, table setting and other diet and nutrition skills at one single event. Youth may enter as an individual or as a team (consisting of 2 members). Individuals and teams plan and submit a menu for one balanced meal (breakfast, lunch, and dinner). The event is an excellent opportunity to enter something that cannot be entered at the County Fair, such as a main dish, soup or salad.

Our youth prepared their menus and food item for the April 2nd event. Most were dressed to match their themed table setting while others were dressed in their best attire. It was a beautiful spring day so while some of our youth were waiting to talk to the judges, they could play outside or enjoy crafts inside. Grace McMullen, a member of the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club, reflected that Champion Chow gave her the opportunity to see what everyone else makes so you could do the same thing at home. This year, Grace made microphone cupcakes because she decided on a music theme.

There is some youth who like to cook while others like the combination of crafts and food at one single event. One such 4-H’er is Sam Jones from Liberty 4-H Club. Sam made Cinnamon Ice Cream for his summer theme. Terry Fields, of the Greater Loch Raven 4-H Club, on the other hand, enjoys cooking. He made Brownie S’mores for his theme of camping. He hopes to become a chef one day. Ben McMullen, thinks cooking is cool and thinks it is a very significant talent. He made a delicious chili. This was Ben’s first time browning meat. He picked a Star Wars theme because that is his favorite movie.

Other youths seek their inspirations from sources beyond Baltimore. One such 4-H’er was Kailyn of Chestnut Ridge 4-H Club. Kailyn is going to New Orleans soon and decided to research King cakes. The King cake is a cake that is made during Mardi Gras. It is decorated with the colors Purple for Justice, Green for Faith and Gold for Power. Baked inside the cake is a baby. Whoever gets the piece with the baby in it will have good luck all year. That person will bake the cake for the next year including the baby, and so the tradition continues. 

This food challenge brings youth from 5-18 together to enjoy the art of setting the table, creating a theme, planning a healthy meal and learning to cook a delicious dish. As part of the competition each youth meets with the judges individually to talk about what they made, how they prepared it and why they selected the items in their theme. It is through this type of competition that each child increases their confidence and communication skills. I can’t think of a better way to spend a Sunday afternoon.

The Fine Art of Keeping Records in 4-H

One of the hallmarks of 4-H is the many life lessons the youth acquire through their projects. A unique experience is that of record keeping. All 4-H’ers if they want to compete in the fair have to keep records of spending on their project, what they communicated to others about their project, learning while doing their project, helping someone else through their project, overcoming a challenge and where they showed their project. It is all collected in what is known as a 4-H Record Book.

This Sunday we had a great turnout for our annual record book training which took place at the 4-H office. Led by Jennifer Coroneos, a 4-H program assistant, 4-H alumna and award-winning record book holder. The goal was to help families navigate their way through doing a project summary or a full record book on this past year’s projects. 4-H’ers brought their receipts on feed for animals, paint for paintings, etc. Additionally many brought laptops, photos from events, ribbons they won and calendars they kept throughout the year. Some brought rough drafts of their 4-H story or started it at the workshop.

Everyone left with a lot more completed then when they came and a better understanding of what is needed to make a successful record book. All of the work the 4-H youth did at the training will be submitted by February 1, 2017, to the Baltimore County 4-H office and judged alongside all of the other 4-H’ers in this county. The prizes for this will be announced at the Achievement Night event on March 19, 2017, at Oregon Ridge in the Sequoia Room at 3 pm.

The youth are divided up into three groups, clovers, juniors/intermediates and seniors. Each of these groups have different requirements based on the level they were at in the past calendar year (2016).

Clovers can turn in a Clover Memory Book that includes:

  • Cover
  • Page 1  Introduction page.  Include a picture of yourself.  Below the picture, print the following information — name, birth date, address, and 4-H club.
  • Page 2 Table of Contents. List what you have in your memory book in the order it appears while paging through the book (this may be subject, items, programs, etc.).
    This helps the reader to move through the book as you would through a story.
    There is nothing required in this book except those keepsakes/items you want to keep.

    Suggestions: 
    1. Pictures, Post Cards, Drawings
    2. Cards, Invitations, Personal Letters
    3. Favors, Club Programs, Souvenirs
    4. Awards, Certificates, Honors
    5. Poems, Stories, Jokes, etc., (written by you to tell about your project, or other 4-H activities)
    6. other items you would like us to see that you have done

    The ONLY requirement is that the book closes smoothly without any significant lumps or bulges. This eliminates many 3-dimensional items.

A complete record book for Juniors and Intermediates includes the following:

Your Record Book Check List

  • Record Book Score Card (Office will supply)
  • Judging Project Record Sheet (Office will supply)
  • Title Page (you create)
  • Table of Contents (you create)
  • Judging Summary Form (on website)
  • Summary Record (on website)
  • 4-H Story (you create)
  • Project Pictures (maximum of 6 pages)
  • Project Record(s) (on website)

Each senior portfolio should include a:

  • Senior Portfolio Score Card (Office will add)
  • Judging Project Record Sheet (Office will add)
  • Judging Summary Form (on website)
  • Title Page (you create)
  • Resume (you create)
  • Essay (you create)
    This year’s theme is “What three adjectives best describe 4-H and describe how they relate to your 4-H experience.”
  • Project Pictures (maximum of 6 pages)
  • Project Record(s) (on website)

For more information on completing a record book go to https://extension.umd.edu/baltimore-county/record-book-ideas

 

4-H Steer Tagging Day

On a cold, 10° morning with snow coming down on the Maryland State Fairgrounds 4-H’ers, their parents, leaders and their steer wait for their steer’s turn to be weighed and tagged. While many youths are sleeping in on this bitterly cold morning, our 4-H’ers are up well before daybreak. Besides the regular feeding of their animals in the morning today, they will need to put the halters on their steer and get them on the trailers. Shares Shelby Sheats a Parkton 4-H Club member. This work is no easy task for many. The steer simply does not want to get on and go for a ride. Most of the steer range from 450 to close to 850 lbs. This job takes strength and perseverance in helping the animal to cooperate.

The purpose of ear tagging according to Rachel Preston, another Parkton 4-H Club member, is for identification. The tag helps the owner keep track of all health records and proper weight of gain. When the steers are brought in, they are weighed and then again at show time in July. It is necessary for the 4-H’er to properly feed their animal so that it grows at the proper amount over the next six months.

The 4-H market steer project allows 4-H members to feed, fit and show a beef animal. Depending on the starting age and weight, most steers will be full -fed for five months or longer. The steer should reach the desired USDA Choice carcass grade at a weight of 100 to 1000 pounds at about 15 to 18 months of age. The weight and age at which steers reach the choice grade will vary due to breed, frame size and management of the steer.

After the steer has completed its growth cycle, the 4-H’er can exhibit and market their steer at one of the several market steer shows held each summer. The market steer project helps the 4-H youth obtain a sense of responsibility. The project encourages decision-making, a trait that is beneficial throughout life. Participation in this project allows the 4-H’er to conduct financial transactions on a larger scale than the average youth. The project also will help them develop healthy skills in competition. Finally, the market steer project is designed to instill a love for cattle in 4-H youth and an appreciation for their significant role in agriculture and society.

On this frigid morning in January, Danielle Ryndak, from the 4-H Dairy Goat and Liberty Clubs, is bringing her very first steer to be tagged and weighed. She is excited to take on this new and challenging project. And while today’s adventures are coming to an end, it is only the beginning for our 4-H’ers. From now and until show time on July 13-15, there will be feeding both before school and after. Cleaning of the barns, working with their animals so that they are ready to be handled in the ring. Checking them for health problems and addressing them as they arise and making sure they have time to exercise and graze.

If you would like to see how well these and many other 4-H’ers have worked with their animals this year, please join us July 13-15 at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium.

 

My first train the trainer session

My first train the trainer session

By: Bidemi Oladiran (AmeriCorps VISTA)

insect pal thing

I began my first train the trainer session on September 24, 2015 where my supervisor and I managed nine Police Athletic League (PAL) center directors, who are in charge of afterschool programs across the state. The meeting focused on different activities to present to K-12 youth at their individual sites. The first activity involved using the 4H curriculum: Persistent Pests where we used dark and light colored beans to illustrate pesticide resistant and non-resistant insects and how they can have a negative impact on agriculture. The group was broken down into three groups and each group completed this activity. Afterwards I went through questions with the group to illustrate how this can be relevant in many different ways, not just in terms of agriculture. We illustrated how bugs can become resistant to pesticides over time and how this can affect the environment negatively. We mentioned ways to counteract this, by including different insects into the environment over time to decrease the likelihood of pesticide resistance. I also went over how this can be used in other science and medical fields, where bacteria can become resistant to certain medicines and antibiotics causing disease that are difficult and nearly impossible to treat in humans and animals.

The second activity focused on using the 4H engineering curriculum: Will it float? This presented a beginning to underwater robotics. The goal of the activity was to illustrate how items can sink or float. The first parts of the activity involved getting all the groups to work together and try to build an aluminum boat that could hold as much beans as possible before it started to sink. In this activity the group learned about how engineers often have to create multiple prototypes before they can make their final model. This activity got everyone to come up with different ideas for their boats. The second part of the activity focused on finding what items sink vs float vs flinker using what we call “junk robotics” (anything lying around) to test what can sink, float or flinker. A flinker as I found out was something that doesn’t float to the top or sink to the bottom; it’s below the water’s surface but won’t sink. This activity got everyone excited including me. The entire group was trying to find different ways to make a flinker; unfortunately we were unsuccessful with the limited time we had. Afterwards, we illustrated how if we as grown-ups had fun doing these activities, then the youth would enjoy it also. They could gain an insight into how engineers design and re-design different models when making various prototypes.

Ashley Treadwell

The first in a series of Baltimore County 4-Hers reflecting on where 4-H has taken them.

Ashley TreadwellThe first in a series of Baltimore County 4-Hers reflecting on where 4-H has taken them.

By Ashley Treadwell

This fall I will become a Cyclone, joining my fellow classmates and start a new chapter of my life at Iowa State University. There, I will meet new friends and hopefully learn a lot about the agricultural industry. I plan on majoring in Agricultural Education and hope to double major that with International Ag. I have been in 4-H for the past six years and have learned so much and made many friends within that time. I am thankful for all those who have helped me. They have encouraged me to do my best to do by doing and for that I am grateful. Without 4-H I would not be as good of a public speaker as I am or know as much about the Livestock Industries. For younger 4-Hers, I encourage you to do some research of 4-H competitions and trips the state and national 4-H hold. Those experiences will last a lifetime and not only will you have a blast but you will learn so much that you will think that you can’t learn anymore. I wish that I could have found out about some of the competitions and trips before my senior year of high school. The more you do, the more experience you gain, making you a more well- rounded person on the whole. I am thankful for my 4-H career and am excited for my last year in 4-H.

ashley showing ashley with a game ashley bone Ashley public speaking