The Fine Art of Keeping Records in 4-H

One of the hallmarks of 4-H is the many life lessons the youth acquire through their projects. A unique experience is that of record keeping. All 4-H’ers if they want to compete in the fair have to keep records of spending on their project, what they communicated to others about their project, learning while doing their project, helping someone else through their project, overcoming a challenge and where they showed their project. It is all collected in what is known as a 4-H Record Book.

This Sunday we had a great turnout for our annual record book training which took place at the 4-H office. Led by Jennifer Coroneos, a 4-H program assistant, 4-H alumna and award-winning record book holder. The goal was to help families navigate their way through doing a project summary or a full record book on this past year’s projects. 4-H’ers brought their receipts on feed for animals, paint for paintings, etc. Additionally many brought laptops, photos from events, ribbons they won and calendars they kept throughout the year. Some brought rough drafts of their 4-H story or started it at the workshop.

Everyone left with a lot more completed then when they came and a better understanding of what is needed to make a successful record book. All of the work the 4-H youth did at the training will be submitted by February 1, 2017, to the Baltimore County 4-H office and judged alongside all of the other 4-H’ers in this county. The prizes for this will be announced at the Achievement Night event on March 19, 2017, at Oregon Ridge in the Sequoia Room at 3 pm.

The youth are divided up into three groups, clovers, juniors/intermediates and seniors. Each of these groups have different requirements based on the level they were at in the past calendar year (2016).

Clovers can turn in a Clover Memory Book that includes:

  • Cover
  • Page 1  Introduction page.  Include a picture of yourself.  Below the picture, print the following information — name, birth date, address, and 4-H club.
  • Page 2 Table of Contents. List what you have in your memory book in the order it appears while paging through the book (this may be subject, items, programs, etc.).
    This helps the reader to move through the book as you would through a story.
    There is nothing required in this book except those keepsakes/items you want to keep.

    Suggestions: 
    1. Pictures, Post Cards, Drawings
    2. Cards, Invitations, Personal Letters
    3. Favors, Club Programs, Souvenirs
    4. Awards, Certificates, Honors
    5. Poems, Stories, Jokes, etc., (written by you to tell about your project, or other 4-H activities)
    6. other items you would like us to see that you have done

    The ONLY requirement is that the book closes smoothly without any significant lumps or bulges. This eliminates many 3-dimensional items.

A complete record book for Juniors and Intermediates includes the following:

Your Record Book Check List

  • Record Book Score Card (Office will supply)
  • Judging Project Record Sheet (Office will supply)
  • Title Page (you create)
  • Table of Contents (you create)
  • Judging Summary Form (on website)
  • Summary Record (on website)
  • 4-H Story (you create)
  • Project Pictures (maximum of 6 pages)
  • Project Record(s) (on website)

Each senior portfolio should include a:

  • Senior Portfolio Score Card (Office will add)
  • Judging Project Record Sheet (Office will add)
  • Judging Summary Form (on website)
  • Title Page (you create)
  • Resume (you create)
  • Essay (you create)
    This year’s theme is “What three adjectives best describe 4-H and describe how they relate to your 4-H experience.”
  • Project Pictures (maximum of 6 pages)
  • Project Record(s) (on website)

For more information on completing a record book go to https://extension.umd.edu/baltimore-county/record-book-ideas

 

4-H Steer Tagging Day

On a cold, 10° morning with snow coming down on the Maryland State Fairgrounds 4-H’ers, their parents, leaders and their steer wait for their steer’s turn to be weighed and tagged. While many youths are sleeping in on this bitterly cold morning, our 4-H’ers are up well before daybreak. Besides the regular feeding of their animals in the morning today, they will need to put the halters on their steer and get them on the trailers. Shares Shelby Sheats a Parkton 4-H Club member. This work is no easy task for many. The steer simply does not want to get on and go for a ride. Most of the steer range from 450 to close to 850 lbs. This job takes strength and perseverance in helping the animal to cooperate.

The purpose of ear tagging according to Rachel Preston, another Parkton 4-H Club member, is for identification. The tag helps the owner keep track of all health records and proper weight of gain. When the steers are brought in, they are weighed and then again at show time in July. It is necessary for the 4-H’er to properly feed their animal so that it grows at the proper amount over the next six months.

The 4-H market steer project allows 4-H members to feed, fit and show a beef animal. Depending on the starting age and weight, most steers will be full -fed for five months or longer. The steer should reach the desired USDA Choice carcass grade at a weight of 100 to 1000 pounds at about 15 to 18 months of age. The weight and age at which steers reach the choice grade will vary due to breed, frame size and management of the steer.

After the steer has completed its growth cycle, the 4-H’er can exhibit and market their steer at one of the several market steer shows held each summer. The market steer project helps the 4-H youth obtain a sense of responsibility. The project encourages decision-making, a trait that is beneficial throughout life. Participation in this project allows the 4-H’er to conduct financial transactions on a larger scale than the average youth. The project also will help them develop healthy skills in competition. Finally, the market steer project is designed to instill a love for cattle in 4-H youth and an appreciation for their significant role in agriculture and society.

On this frigid morning in January, Danielle Ryndak, from the 4-H Dairy Goat and Liberty Clubs, is bringing her very first steer to be tagged and weighed. She is excited to take on this new and challenging project. And while today’s adventures are coming to an end, it is only the beginning for our 4-H’ers. From now and until show time on July 13-15, there will be feeding both before school and after. Cleaning of the barns, working with their animals so that they are ready to be handled in the ring. Checking them for health problems and addressing them as they arise and making sure they have time to exercise and graze.

If you would like to see how well these and many other 4-H’ers have worked with their animals this year, please join us July 13-15 at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium.